Social Capacity

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Social capacity is core to the ability to develop and measure the human dimensions of society's output.

Definition

Social Capacity is the skills, intelligences, attitudes and behaviours an individual needs to engage with others to achieve fulfilment in life, and to provide a positive contribution to the society on which that fulfilment depends, and which are not limited by self-perceptions and social circumstances.

Related Notes

Social Capacity
Social Capacity relates to the personal physical and emotional ability to achieve fulfilment through engagement and positive contribution to society. It governs the extent to which Capability can be realised after personal limitations on capability are factored, such as: limiting self-perceptions, such as low self-worth and frustrated ambition.

Social Capability
Social Capability relates to the ability to contribute to society and to achieve personal goals after external constraints are factored, such as: legislation, social circumstance, social expectations, social exclusion and economic dependency.

Fulfilment
To achieve fulfilment, a person will sense their degree of happiness, engagement, productivity and security. These are influenced by their sense of meaning and purpose in life.

Engagement
Engagement involves an investment of time and/or effort to achieve an output. In a fair society, the degree to which and individual shares in society's output has some level of correlation with their level of input. Engagement helps each of us shape our place in society, and is a component in determining the our sense of the level of fairness in society.

Security and Belonging
To feel secure, an individual must have reasonable expectation of physical security. Being social animals, we associate our physical security with the intensity by which we are accepted within the various communities with which we associate. To feel secure, humans must feel they receive a fair share of the outputs of society, and have a rational sense of belonging. In determining what is a fair share, each of us must have a sense of our individual contribution to society, and a sense of our overall place in society.

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